About NASONEX

Once-daily NASONEX is clinically proven to help treat nasal symptoms of both seasonal (outdoor) and year-round (indoor) allergic rhinitis in adults and children 2 years and older.

NASONEX helps treat nasal congestion that happens with seasonal allergic rhinitis in adults and children 2 years and older.

NASONEX helps prevent nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis in people 12 years and older when started 2 to 4 weeks prior to allergy season.

It is important that you take NASONEX regularly as recommended by your doctor, since its effectiveness depends on regular use. Maximum treatment benefit is usually achieved in 1 to 2 weeks.

Important Safety Information about NASONEX

  • Nosebleeds and infections of the nose and throat may occur.
  • NASONEX may cause slow wound healing. Do not use NASONEX until your nose is healed if you have a sore in your nose, if you have surgery on your nose or if your nose has been injured.
  • Some people may have eye problems, including glaucoma and cataracts. You should have regular eye exams.
Important Safety Information continued below

Outdoor vs indoor


Identifying your allergens

Nasal allergy symptoms can be triggered by indoor (or year-round) or outdoor (or seasonal) allergens. Knowing which allergens you react to can help you and your health care provider create a plan for limiting your exposure, and potentially, your symptoms.

Indoor (year-round) nasal allergy symptoms can persist year-round and are caused by indoor allergens like mold, dust mites, cockroaches, and animal dander. These allergens can be present in pillows and bedding, draperies, upholstery, thick carpeting, on your clothing, on your pets, and in moist areas of your home like bathrooms and basements.

Outdoor (seasonal) nasal allergy symptoms are very common and are usually caused by allergens that appear at specific times of the year, with some variation due to weather. In the spring, tree pollens are a common trigger. From late spring to summer, grasses enter the scene. Weed pollens—including ragweed—start becoming a problem for some people in the summer, and peak in the fall. Finally, throughout the year in many states, but especially after a spring thaw, outdoor mold spores are a trigger. Outdoor molds are very common, found in soil, some mulches, fallen leaves, and rotting wood.

It's possible to be affected by more than one allergen of either or both types, but here's a quick way to sort through them.



NOTE: Pollen counts may vary based on geographical location.

Get more detailed information about these common allergens, more specific information about seasonal allergy patterns in your area, or tips on managing outdoor or indoor allergies.

A few things to keep in mind

  • You may be reacting to more than one type of allergen. For example, having nasal allergies to both trees and grass can make your symptoms worse during the summer, when both of these pollens are high.
  • Mold spores are another allergen that can cause problems in the fall, especially if you are raking leaves or doing yard work. Molds grow in dark, wet places and can disperse in the air if you rake or disturb the area where they've settled.
  • People with indoor nasal allergies can be bothered by outdoor nasal allergies as well. You may need ongoing treatment to help relieve indoor nasal allergy symptoms.

Your health care provider can help you pinpoint what you are allergic to, and tell you the best way to treat your nasal allergy symptoms. Provide detailed information about your lifestyle and habits to your health care provider—it will help him or her provide you with an appropriate treatment plan for relieving your symptoms.


Get a coupon Terms and Conditions Symptom Checklist Learn More

Important Safety Information (continued)

  • Nosebleeds and infections of the nose and throat may occur.
  • NASONEX may cause slow wound healing. Do not use NASONEX until your nose is healed if you have a sore in your nose, if you have surgery on your nose or if your nose has been injured.
  • Some people may have eye problems, including glaucoma and cataracts. You should have regular eye exams.
  • NASONEX may cause immune system problems that can increase your risk of getting infections. Avoid contact with people who have infections like chickenpox or measles while using NASONEX. Tell your doctor about any signs of infection, such as fever, pain, aches, chills, feeling tired, nausea, and vomiting while using NASONEX.
  • A condition in which the adrenal glands do not make enough steroid hormones may occur. Symptoms can include tiredness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, and low blood pressure.
  • The most common side effects include headache, viral infection, sore throat, nosebleeds, and coughing.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please read the Patient Information and discuss it with your doctor. The physician Prescribing Information also is available.

This site is intended for use by U.S. residents.

RESP-1059806-0002 11/13

Having trouble paying for your Merck medicine? Merck may be able to help. For more information please visit www.merck.com/merckhelps.