About NASONEX

Once-daily NASONEX is clinically proven to help treat nasal symptoms of both seasonal (outdoor) and year-round (indoor) allergic rhinitis in adults and children 2 years and older.

NASONEX helps treat nasal congestion that happens with seasonal allergic rhinitis in adults and children 2 years and older.

NASONEX helps prevent nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis in people 12 years and older when started 2 to 4 weeks prior to allergy season.

It is important that you take NASONEX regularly as recommended by your doctor, since its effectiveness depends on regular use. Maximum treatment benefit is usually achieved in 1 to 2 weeks.

Important Safety Information about NASONEX

  • NASONEX may cause immune system problems that can increase your risk of getting infections. Avoid contact with people who have infections like chickenpox or measles while using NASONEX. Tell your doctor about any signs of infection, such as fever, pain, aches, chills, feeling tired, nausea, and vomiting while using NASONEX.
  • A condition in which the adrenal glands do not make enough steroid hormones may occur. Symptoms can include tiredness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, and low blood pressure.
Important Safety Information continued below

Allergens

Depending on when and where you experience nasal allergy symptoms, you could be reacting to either outdoor (or seasonal) allergens, indoor (or year-round) allergens, or both. Here are some common allergens of each type. If you believe you are reacting to one or more of these common allergens, ask your health care provider to help you develop a plan to treat—and in the case of outdoor or perennial allergens, to help prevent—most of the nasal allergy symptoms they can cause.

NASONEX has not been demonstrated to be effective in treating nasal symptoms of seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis caused by each of the specific pollens listed.

Outdoor Allergens

Pollens and mold spores are outdoor allergens that float in the air and commonly trigger nasal allergy symptoms. During peak seasons, you may experience increased symptoms—congestion, sneezing, itchy nose or runny nose—depending on where you live and the specific allergens that are triggers for you. Weather factors such as sun, rain, and wind can also affect the amount and types of allergens in the air and their production. For example, outdoor allergens may be reduced on days that are rainy, cloudy, or windless because it's harder for allergens to become airborne during these conditions. Hot, dry, and windy weather can mean more pollen and mold are in the air, leading to increased nasal allergy symptoms.

If outdoor allergens are triggers for you, developing strategies to reduce your exposure is a good start. However, since these allergens are difficult to avoid completely, your health care provider may recommend you use a medication to treat or to help prevent your nasal allergy symptoms.

Pollen

Pollen is a microscopic, powdery substance used by plants for fertilization and reproduction. Pollens are carried between plants by wind, water, animals, bees and other insects. Nasal allergy symptoms are more often triggered by plants with small pollens that are spread by wind currents such as trees, grasses, and weeds. Generally, the pollens from brightly flowered plants with larger pollen grains don't trigger nasal allergies. If your nasal allergy symptoms are worse in some seasons than others, it may mean you're allergic to pollen.

Molds

Molds are microscopic members of the fungus family, which also includes mushrooms. Mold spores travel through the air like pollen. However, unlike pollen, they do not have a specific season but tend to thrive in moist situations and are affected by wind or rain. Outdoor mold spores begin to appear after a spring thaw and typically peak between July and October. In regions with mild winters, outdoor molds can be found all year long.

Indoor allergens

Indoor, or perennial, nasal allergies are triggered by another group of allergens, including dust mites, animal dander and urine, cockroach droppings, and indoor molds.

If you have indoor nasal allergies, you may have symptoms year round, and you may notice they get worse in certain situations; this can offer clues to the specific allergen or allergens you react to. If you experience symptoms like congestion, sneezing, itchy nose or runny nose, take notice of when and where they start and are at their worst.

If indoor allergens are triggers for you, learning ways to limit their presence in your home or workplace is a start. However, since these allergens are difficult to avoid completely, your health care provider may recommend that you use a medication to help manage your nasal allergy symptoms, or undergo an immunology treatment program (allergy shots) to build your tolerance.

Animals

Animals with fur or feathers can cause nasal allergy symptoms. Although many people think it's the hair or feathers that's causing the reactions, it is actually saliva, proteins in animals' dander (dead skin), and urine that cause nasal allergy problems. Symptoms of pet allergies can occur immediately or about 8 to 12 hours after exposure. The best way to avoid animal allergens is to avoid contact with furry or feathered animals or their bedding.

Dust mites

Dust mites are microscopic creatures that live in dust and consume discarded flakes of human skin. Dust mite droppings are a common trigger of nasal allergy symptoms, and are found throughout homes, especially in parts of the home with high humidity or a concentration of human skin flakes, such as mattresses or pillows. Regular vacuuming with a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter can help reduce your contact with dust mites, as can covering mattresses and pillows.

Molds

Indoor molds thrive in dark, damp places such as basements and bathrooms. When these molds release airborne spores, they can trigger nasal allergy symptoms. Regular cleaning with a weak bleach solution can help eliminate mold and minimize future growth. If you see mold on a carpet or other item in the house, remove it promptly.

Cockroaches

Several species of cockroaches live in homes and other buildings, especially in urban areas, and especially where food and water can be found readily. Experts believe that cockroaches' bodies, as well as their feces and saliva, can trigger nasal allergies. Try to avoid cockroaches by keeping food and pet foods covered and in sealed containers, cleaning well after meals, and taking garbage and recyclables out frequently. Poison baits or boric acid may also help, as may sealing cracks and other places where cockroaches may enter your home.


Get a coupon Terms and Conditions Symptom Checklist Learn More

Important Safety Information (continued)

  • Nosebleeds and infections of the nose and throat may occur.
  • NASONEX may cause slow wound healing. Do not use NASONEX until your nose is healed if you have a sore in your nose, if you have surgery on your nose or if your nose has been injured.
  • Some people may have eye problems, including glaucoma and cataracts. You should have regular eye exams.
  • NASONEX may cause immune system problems that can increase your risk of getting infections. Avoid contact with people who have infections like chickenpox or measles while using NASONEX. Tell your doctor about any signs of infection, such as fever, pain, aches, chills, feeling tired, nausea, and vomiting while using NASONEX.
  • A condition in which the adrenal glands do not make enough steroid hormones may occur. Symptoms can include tiredness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, and low blood pressure.
  • The most common side effects include headache, viral infection, sore throat, nosebleeds, and coughing.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please read the Patient Information and discuss it with your doctor. The physician Prescribing Information also is available.

This site is intended for use by U.S. residents.

RESP-1059806-0002 11/13

Having trouble paying for your Merck medicine? Merck may be able to help. For more information please visit www.merck.com/merckhelps.